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OneNote | A Look Inside

I still have a few more notes to move over from Evernote but I am loving OneNote.  I keep to do lists, goals, projects, ideas, genealogy research and so much more in OneNote.  So what does my setup look like?  Lets take a look!



{I usually use OneNote 2016 but I have tried the Windows 10 app and it works just as good.}

The first screen shot below is OneNote 2016 and the second is from the Windows 10 app.  My first notebook is my task management notebook.  In this notebook I have my Inbox, which is my default section for incoming stuff, calendar and lists.  {Emails that I have sent to OneNote and screen clips go in my Inbox section.} The next notebook is for my blog, and then the Genealogy notebook is for research notes, then I have the GBT notebook which I use for notes and reminders for GeneaBloggersTribe, the Reference notebook is for things that don't belong in one of the other notebooks,  and the last notebook is the Archive.




Lets take a closer look at some of these notebooks.  The Task Management notebook {screen shot below} is my most used notebook.  


Inbox -  is a temporary holding area for things I want to read later or save.  These notes are frequently moved to other sections or deleted once I am done with them. 

Calendar - I am in this section several times a day.  I have a weekly note that I use for todo lists and reminders.  There is also a calendar note that is updated weekly with appointments. {I still keep a Google Calendar and use that to update the calendar note.} This section is also where I keep my health tracker and sleep tracker.  I usually have three months worth of calendars in this section.

Contacts - You guessed it, important emails and phone numbers are kept in this section.  I use one note per contact so I can leave notes about what I contacted them for.  {I use this mainly for genealogy purposes.}  

Master Lists - I have one big list of things I want to do, need to get done, and the honey do list.  Cleaning lists are kept here as well.

To Buy - This is for things that I want to buy eventually or products that I am researching.

Family Reunion - I am in charge of the reunion and I have lists of things to make sure I have the day of and ideas for the reunion.

Goals - This is for the goals that I want to complete this year.  I review this every month to make necessary adjustments and leave notes on my progress.

Templates -  This section is used for the templates that I created that I use all the time.  I have a template for my weekly to page, a template for my sleep and health tracker, etc.

Quick Notes - This section is where the quick notes go. 

 Also, in the Task Management notebook will be sections for projects and then once that project is done I can archive or delete the section.

My blog notebook has sections for my content calendar, post ideas and some templates for writing blog posts.  The Reference notebook has sections for stuff that does not need a separate notebook like some scrapbooking page ideas, bullet journal ideas, etc.  The Archive notebook is where I put project sections when I am finished with them.  I also use it to archive my weekly pages and monthly calendar.

In my next post I will share my Genealogy notebook.

How are you using OneNote?


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