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Evernote to OneNote | Importing Notes






A few weeks ago I posted about moving to OneNote from Evernote.  To start the process I searched for a way export my Evernote notes into OneNote.  At the OneNote website you can download a OneNote importer.  Once it is downloaded double click to open and follow the instructions to link your Evernote account.   {Save the importer because you will be using it a lot to import your notes}.  


Evernote to OneNote

I do not suggest selecting all of your notebooks and doing them at one time, especially if you have a lot of notes.  Before I started the importer I did a little housekeeping in my Evernote notebooks and deleted notes that were not needed.  You can also create some dummy notebooks in Evernote to break up your notes into smaller chunks so you do not run into any issues when importing to OneNote.  Once in OneNote you will want to move your notes around into your new organization system.

Evernote to OneNote

Select your notebook, select next and let the imported do its magic.  It will ask you to sign into your Microsoft account.  It will tell you that your notebook in Evernote will be imported as a notebook in OneNote and each individual note will be imported as pages in the notebook. You can select to have your tags imported to OneNote as well.  The tags will show up in each note as a hashtag {#} and they are searchable.  {I did have them brought in but realized that I did not need them.}

Evernote to OneNote

It does take some time depending on how many notes you are importing.  When it is done you will see the screen below.

Evernote to OneNote

To get back to where you select Evernote notes to import click on #2 on the left in the image above and start the import process over again.

In the next installment of Evernote to OneNote I will show you my setup. 

If you have any questions about OneNote or Evernote you can email me at sthomas51004@gmail.com or you can use the Contact Me button above.

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