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Louisa Nagle Kinley and / or Pealer


I have a death certificate for a Louisa Pealer with a date of birth as 4 Oct 1830.  My Louisa Kinley has a birth date of 4 Oct 1830 {she is buried with her husband George Kinley} which I found on findagrave.com and confirmed by going to the Creveling cemetery in Almedia, Columbia county, Pennsylvania and taking a photo of the headstone.  The death date of 5 Nov 1908 matches as well.
Headstone for Louisa Kinley wife of George Kinley in Crevling Cemetery, Almedia, Columbia county, Pennsylvania.
Close up of headstone.
Pennsylvania Death Certificate for Louisa Pealer
On the death certificate it lists the informant as Fanny R Sutliff and from census records(see below) I know that George and Louisa had a daughter named Fanny. Louisa's parents are listed as Jocob and Rebecca Moyer Nagle.

Census Comparison Sheet following the family through the census'

Also, the death certificate lists the date of burial as being 9 Nov 1908 at Almedia.  Bingo!  The cemetery that my Louisa and George are buried in is in Almedia!

Another clue...the death certificate states that she died in Fishing Creek, Columbia county, Pennsylvania.

(The funny thing about the death certificate is the note I wrote to myself...the person writing this is either confused or drunk.  LOL).

I do believe this is my Louisa.  I will look for a marriage notice and or record for her second marriage to another person with the surname of Pealer.


Sources :

Columbia County, Pennsylvania, death certificate no. 111823 (1908), Louisa Pealer; digital image, "Pennsylvania, Death Certificates, 1906-1944," Ancestry (ancestry.com : accessed 29 Aug 2014).

1850 U.S. census, population schedule, Bloom Township, Columbia county, Pennsylvania, USA, dwelling 345, family 359, George Kinley; digital images, Ancestry (ancestry.com : accessed 18 Sep 2014); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm M432, roll 769.

1860 U.S. census, population schedule, Scott Township, Columbia county, Pennsylvania, USA, p. 102 (written), dwelling 774, family 774, George Kinley; digital images, Ancestry (ancestry.com : accessed 18 Sep 2014); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm M653, roll 1098.

1870 U.S. census, population schedule, Centre Township, Columbia county, Pennsylvania, USA, p. 1, dwelling 8, family 8, George Kinley; digital images, Ancestry (ancestry.com : accessed 18 Sep 2014); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm M593, roll 1329

1880 U.S. census, population schedule, Scott Township, Columbia, Pennsylvania, USA, enumeration district (ED) 186, p. 340B, dwelling 140, family 140, Louisa Kinley; digital images, Ancestry (ancestry.com : accessed 9 Jan 2015); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm T9, roll 1119.

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